Worm Propaganda

wirtheim-vermiprize-entry-02

We at WormCulture are honored that the Portland Oregon designer Joe Wirtheim created a propaganda poster for worms. It is a new addition to his long-running series called The Victory Garden of Tomorrow. It includes several space age chickens, plants and people and you can see the whole series on his website. We are told that this new poster, Worms will do the Work will eventually be available for purchase there.

Joe says: “this project is committed to civic innovation and social progress — better food, better gardens, and better cities. I get really excited about edible school gardens, city bicycles, home cooking, backyard chickens, beekeeping, rooftop gardens and really anything that brings health and activity to people’s lives. I love looking at vintage graphics, especially mid-century propaganda and advertising.”

About this design: “I’m inspired by the power and relentless energy of such a small creature. As described by Youngs and the Worm Culture blog, these creatures and their microbe allies take our discards and attack them with vigor. The result is a valuable resource for any gardener. I wanted to show our Red Wriggler in a heroic light among their work; cute, harmless and in our service.”

Compostable fashion and art

compostable hats by Lorrie McAllisterThe McAllister family created 3 artworks that worms and humans can enjoy. Lorrie made two compostable hats – modeled by daughters Iris and Harriet. From Lorrie:

“I’m interested in compostable fashion and sustainable art about nature and our relationship to it.  It is our responsibility to ensure the long-term health of our world and its inhabitants –you, me, worms and all living creatures.”

And this is 8-year old Harriet’s inspired collage, Worm Digging in Earth.

Worm Digging in Earth by Harriet McAllister

“I love worms and the environment, so I made art about worms. I hope that more people will learn about and care for worms.”

Earthworm: drawings from observation

An exploration of external and internal anatomy, by Katherine Beigel

Section from Katherine Beigel's drawing

Ecologically indispensable, the earthworm is an intriguing organism both inside and out. With musculature and a digestive system that span its entire length, the earthworm’s activity in its environment contributes a slew of biogeochemical effects to the surrounding soils and local organisms. I took careful observations of its anatomical structures, particularly as they may relate to the worm’s physiology and behavior. Like many organisms that contribute to overall ecosystem health, the earthworm’s evolutionary lineage is intimately intertwined with its habitat. Understanding this valuable relationship allows humans to incorporate it into their own dwellings, overlapping the boundaries of modern human living with the natural world.

– Katherine Beigel